This Four-Ingredient Topping Will Enhance the Flavor of (Almost) Anything

This Four-Ingredient Topping Will Enhance the Flavor of (Almost) Anything

 

I love this topping!  You can literally put it on anything! Let me know if you make it and what you used it for.  It is packed with god for you Omega-3’s.

This article originally appeared on Real Simple.  For more recipes, visit realsimple.com.

By ANANDA EIDELSTEIN

May 14, 2018
Greg DuPree

Sometimes all you need is a little sprinkle of something truly transformative to elevate a dish from simple to sublime. No, I’m not referring to my personal favorite, flaky salt. I’m talking about a special blend made from just four better-for-you ingredients.

This fragrant concoction of walnuts and flaxseed meal is a game-changer when scattered over roasted vegetables of all kinds, from asparagus to root vegetables. It can also add zing to raw vegetables like radishes or ripe summer tomatoes. Just a dash can perk up a mixed salad, roasted salmon, or a simply seared steak. It essentially acts as a gluten-free and more flavorful and healthy alternative to breadcrumbs. I even use it to top my morning porridge, whether I’m going with oats or quinoa. The magical perk about this easy topper is that it works with both sweet and savory dishes.

The Flaxseed-Walnut Crumble starts with a big handful of walnuts. Toss them with coconut oil and turmeric then toast in the oven to further bring out their fragrant nuttiness. Walnuts are packed with anti-inflammatory omega-3s and are also rich in antioxidants. Coconut oil, a good fat when consumed in moderation, adds a hint sweetness, plus the fatty acids found in the oil can kill harmful bacteria and viruses. Turmeric brings a kick to the mix but also its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. Once the walnuts cool, it’s simply combined with flaxseed meal and a pinch of salt in a food processor. The outcome looks like golden, good-for-you breadcrumbs.

Make a batch and store in an airtight container. It’ll be there for you when you want to add a healthful flavor boost to your dishes or perk up the basics.

10 protein-packed vegetables to stock up on

10 protein-packed vegetables to stock up on

WE ASKED NUTRITIONIST RHIAN STEPHENSON FOR HER PICK OF THE BEST VEGETABLES TO EAT FOR A PROTEIN HIT

Hear the word ‘protein‘ and you immediately think of foods such as fish, eggs and a sirloin steak. What most people don’t know is that every whole food in fact contains protein – so from your morning banana to your evening salad, finding veggies packed with protein is not only easy to do, but super easy for your body to handle.

First, it’s important to note that plant proteins are often classed as ‘incomplete’ proteins, meaning they are low in one or more of the nine essential amino acids required for our bodies to build protein with. However, this doesn’t mean that they’re not beneficial – during the digestion process, amino acid chains from all sources are broken down and made ready for our bodies to use. So, if you’re eating a good mix of fruits, veggies, grains and legumes, then your body simply collects what it needs from the amino soup that your digestion system has already absorbed.

Even better, unlike their animal based counterparts, plant-based foods are practically free from cholesteroland tend to be high in fibre. So, contrary to popular opinion, meeting your protein needs on a plant-based diet can be both simple and successful.

To find out exactly which veggies pack a healthy punch we got in touch with expert naturopath and nutritionist Rhian Stephenson for her edit of the top 10 protein powerhouses.

BAKED POTATO

5 grams of protein for a good, medium sized potato

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Baked potatoes are one of the top sources of potassium (if you eat the skin!), a good source of vitamin B6, which build cells, and helps break down glycogen, the sugar stored in our muscle cells, and although they are starchy they are very low in calories. Potatoes have been demonised since Atkins and other low carb trends, but they’re actually a good source of nutrition in moderation. It’s usually the topping or preparation method that nudges the calorie count up. Find out more about why potatoes are good for you here.

CORN ON THE COB

5 grams of protein

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Although this is technically a starch, corn is also a good source of protein and fibre. It also contains lutein and zeaxanthin, two phytochemicals that promote healthy vision. Surprisingly, an ear of corn contains about the same number of calories as an apple and about a quarter of the sugar. Blue corn contains anthocyanin, a fantastic antioxidant. Unfortunately, most corn is GMO and not organic, so I would always avoid tinned corn and go for fresh cobs at farmers markets & organic stores.

BROCCOLI

4 grams of protein per cup

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Broccoli of course makes the list, and has a whole host of benefits on top of being rich in protein. In particular, it’s infamous for its cholesterol-lowering ability as it contains a trio of phytonutrients that support the body’s detox process, which helps rid the body of waste. There is a strong combination of both vitamins K and vitamin A, which work together to help keep our vitamin D metabolism in check. Broccoli also contains anti-inflammatory flavonoids and is a great source of chromium and folate.

ARTICHOKE

4 grams of protein per medium artichoke

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On top of being rich in protein, artichokes can relieve pain and discomfort associated with indigestion. In herbal medicine, they are used as a digestive tonic for the gallbladder and liver, and consequently many people swear by them as a natural treatment for hangovers! They are also a good source of fibre and vitamin C. The ORAC rating is 9 times higher than other sources of vitamin C such as oranges and red peppers.

MORE GLOSS: Postcard from LA: The rise of the protein shake

PEAS

4 grams protein per half cup

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Peas are a great source of protein, and are fast becoming the base for a lot of dairy free protein powders. They are one of the most bioavailable sources of proteins and are also rich in phyto-nutrients which help lower cholesterol levels. They contain vitamins A, C and K as well as folates and anti-inflammatory properties. Their iron helps prevent anaemia and fatigue and because they contain so much fibre, they can make you feel fuller longer, thus aiding in weight-loss.

COLLARD GREENS

4 grams of protein for 1 cup, cooked

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Collards can be harder to find in mainstream markets but are easy to get at most organic shops or farmers markets. These greens are low in calories and their high fibre content helps control LDL cholesterol levels. Collard’s phytonutrients have anti-cancer properties and they are a good source of folates and vitamin A, C and K.

OYSTER MUSHROOMS

4 grams of protein for 1 cup

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Mushrooms are one of the most well known protein rich vegetables, and in many Eastern cultures they are used as one of the main protein staples. Of course, they have numerous other benefits as well! These spectacular mushrooms contain ergothioneine, a unique antioxidant that protect cells in the body and reduces inflammation. They have been used medicinally for thousands of years due to their antibacterial effects. They also contain significant levels of zinc, iron, potassium.

SPINACH

3 grams of protein per half a cup, cooked

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Note – this number drops to only 1g protein available from raw spinach. One of my favourite things to do when I need a boost is to get an entire bag of organic spinach and steam it for dinner as a major health boosting side. It wilts down to about an eighth of its size and that’s when the protein count starts to go up. It is also a good source of iron, folates, calcium and vitamin A. In addition to nourishing the eyes and building bones spinach is good for digestion.

BRUSSEL SPROUTS

4 grams of protein per cup

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Brussel Sprouts are a nutritional powerhouse and are unfairly given a hard time. As well as being a good source of protein, they have heaps of potassium and vitamin K, A, C iron and fibre, they are low glycaemic, low calorie, and packed with flavonoid anti-oxidants which offer protection from prostate, colon and endometrial cancers. Their sulphur content also makes them a great detoxification aid.

SWEET POTATO

3 grams of protein per medium potato

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The more popular potato, this has more nutrients than white potatoes but a little less protein. It’s one of the best sources of beta carotene, as well as full of vitamin C, copper and manganese and a host of B vitamins. Its amylose raises blood sugar levels slowly compared to simple fruit sugars and is therefore recommended as a healthy food supplement, even in diabetes. The combination of beta-carotene, E and C make the sweet potato a “beauty food”, all contributing to glowing skin and healthy hair.

Stir Fried Cauliflower Rice

Stir Fried Cauliflower Rice

This is a great Meatless Monday go to recipe.  I have added organic grass fed ground beef and I have also aded chicken.  Share your ideas.

Print Recipe
Stir Fried Cauliflower Rice
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Instructions
  1. Heat oils. Add cauliflower, and kale.  Stir-fry until desired consistency.  Add garlic, ginger, scallions and cilantro. Sir -fry for a minute or two.  Add tamari to your taste, stir and serve.  I have added chicken to this recipe.  So yummy.  Please share your ideas!
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Keto Friendly Turkey Tetrazzini

Keto Friendly Turkey Tetrazzini

I have been watching my sugar lately which means watching the carbs I eat as well.  Did you know they just turn into sugar?  I have been learning a lot about the Keto way of eating.  I will be sharing more about that in future posts.

Turkey Tetrazzini has been a long time favorite in our family. This year I wanted to make it Keto friendly. I stumbled along this Keto friendly turkey tetrazzini recipe that I can’t wait to try.   I changed it up a little from the original recipe.  Please let me know if you make it.  I would love to hear your thoughts or if you made any adjustments. I plan to make it this weekend.

The original recipe can be found at Tasha Metcalf’s site Ketogasm.

 

Print Recipe
Keto Friendly Turkey Tetrazzini
Low Carb Keto Chicken Tetrazzini with Zucchini Noodles [Recipe]
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 45 Minutes
Cook Time 40 Minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 45 Minutes
Cook Time 40 Minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Low Carb Keto Chicken Tetrazzini with Zucchini Noodles [Recipe]
Instructions
  1. Spiralize each zucchini into spaghetti noodle shapes using a spiralizer tool. Salt the zucchini noodles and layout over folded paper towels to remove excess moisture. Let the zucchini noodles sit for 30 minutes, then squeeze to remove additional water from the vegetable.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  3. Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, mushrooms, and garlic to the pan, stirring as needed. When onions become translucent, add the chopped turkey and increase temperature to medium-high.
  4. Add heavy cream to the pan and thoroughly mix while bringing the sauce to a gentle boil. Reduce heat and allow the sauce to simmer for an additional 1-2 minutes.
  5. Remove the sauce from heat and mix in xantham gum to thicken. Stir in 1/4 cup of the parmesan cheese at this time.
  6. Arrange zucchini noodles in the bottom of a deep casserole dish. The zucchini should entirely cover the bottom of the bakeware about an inch thick. For ten servings of the recipe, I use a 9 x 6-inch dish.
  7. Add the creamy turkey mushroom sauce to the top of the zucchini noodles. Smooth the mixture evenly over the top to distribute throughout the casserole dish.
  8. Sprinkle remainder 1/4 cup of parmesan cheese on top and bake for 40 minutes.
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Pumpkin Bread

Pumpkin Bread

Fall is in the air!  Just eat real food!  Right? This recipe is full of real ingredients and easy to make.  Sorry, it is not vegan or gluten free. Enjoy!  (I modified the Banana Bread recipe from “The Best Recipe Cookbook” by the editors of Cook’s Illustrated magazine.)

 

Print Recipe
Pumpkin Bread
A delicious Pumpkin Bread that can be thrown together in about 20 minutes.
Course Breakfast, Snack
Prep Time 20 Minutes
Cook Time 55 Minutes
Passive Time 10 Minutes
Servings
loaf
Ingredients
Course Breakfast, Snack
Prep Time 20 Minutes
Cook Time 55 Minutes
Passive Time 10 Minutes
Servings
loaf
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. 1. Melt butter and set aside to cool. 2. Toast walnuts and set aside. 3. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle rack and heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour bottom only of a regular loaf pan, or grease and flour bottom and sides of nonstick loaf pan: set aside. 4. Whisk first eight ingredients (flour-walnuts) together in large bowl; set aside. 5. Whisk together remaining ingredients (pumpkin-vanilla) with a wooden spoon in a medium bowl. Lightly fold the pumpkin mixture into the dry ingredients with a rubber spatula until just combined and batter looks thick and chunky. Scrape batter into the prepared loaf pan: bake until loaf is golden brown and toothpick inserted comes out clean, about 55 minutes. Cool in pan for 5 minutes, then transfer to wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.
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My Morning Buddha Bowl

My Morning Buddha Bowl

I usually have a smoothie every morning but today I decided to mix it up a little so I made this delicious Morning Buddha Bowl.  This is my version. Please share your ideas!  Enjoy!

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Morning Buddha Bowl
A yummy mixture of yogurt, granola, fruit and more!!
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 5 minutes
Servings
person
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 5 minutes
Servings
person
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Mix the yogurt, oil and Organic Berry Complex together. Layer granola, berries and sprinkle with hemp hearts. I have a mint plant so I added a few chopped mint leaves.
Recipe Notes

This is the Organic Berry Complex I used.

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